bethirstyqueerheart:

eusebes:

Athene by Jan Bintakies

this version of Athene is similar to how I’ve seen her, but without the horsehair on the helmet.

bethirstyqueerheart:

eusebes:

Athene by Jan Bintakies

this version of Athene is similar to how I’ve seen her, but without the horsehair on the helmet.

8 hours ago · 117 notes · Source · Reblogged from elucubrare

merchantshipss:


A Fin whale carcass the bears have been feeding on for the past year lies beneath the surface of the water, Svalbard, Norway.

I’ve been looking for this for such a long time

merchantshipss:

A Fin whale carcass the bears have been feeding on for the past year lies beneath the surface of the water, Svalbard, Norway.

I’ve been looking for this for such a long time

8 hours ago · 125,848 notes · Source · Reblogged from phantomunmasked

mr-dalliard-ive-gone-peculiar:

Michael in the “Homicidal Barber” sketch 

20 hours ago · 185 notes · Source · Reblogged from selfdefenceagainstfruit

winningthebattleloosingthewar:

Archangel Michael’s victory over the Devil, sculpture above the main entrance at St. Michaelis Church, Hamburg

winningthebattleloosingthewar:

Archangel Michael’s victory over the Devil, sculpture above the main entrance at St. Michaelis Church, Hamburg

20 hours ago · 7,400 notes · Source · Reblogged from garrulus

1 day ago · 17 notes · Source · Reblogged from caraspeme

qwantzfeed:

WHY DO WE SAY “NEAR MISS” WHEN THEY’RE REALLY A “NEAR HIT”: because there are many types of misses.  you can miss something by a little (“a near miss”) or by a lot (“a far miss”).  if you DON’T want to be hitting something, a near miss is obviously more dangerous than a far one.  in contrast, when dealing with bombs, a “near miss” of a target is better than a far miss because while you didn’t hit the mark, it may have still be damaged by the explosion.

PATRONAGE | MERCHANDISE | MORE

1 day ago · 197 notes · Reblogged from qwantzfeed

fashionsfromhistory:

Urban Ensemble
c.Mid 19th Century
Belgrade, Serbia
Belgrade City Museum

fashionsfromhistory:

Urban Ensemble

c.Mid 19th Century

Belgrade, Serbia

Belgrade City Museum

1 day ago · 484 notes · Reblogged from fashionsfromhistory

brassmanticore:

Inscribed Pound Weight

Syria, 743 AD

This unusual green glass weight is among the earliest dated Islamic objects (other than coins) in any American museum. In addition to the name al-Walid, who was the financial director of the Damascus treasury, the weight’s inscription, stamped on top in an angular script known as kufic, evokes Yazid III, a caliph, or ruler, of the Umayyad Dynasty (661-750).

Walters Art Museum

1 day ago · 41 notes · Source · Reblogged from elucubrare

ancientart:

Foundation plaques B (photo 1) and A (photo 2), dating to the early 4th century BCE. Both these plaques of hammered gold have been inscribed in Old Persian, and are from Iran during the Achaemenid period.

Artefacts courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA. Photos taken by Daderot via the Wiki Commons.

1 day ago · 1,697 notes · Source · Reblogged from elucubrare

The Ultimate Dandies by Karl Lagerfeld for Numero Homme

1 day ago · 20,946 notes · Source · Reblogged from caraspeme